Please post your Tire and Loading sticker

go-ram

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There was no math I could do. I asked and kept getting the generic “Tow cap is 11340lbs, payload is 1840lbs” from 3 separate sales departments. I asked when I finally decided to build it and they said the computer is not that sophisticated to find out the true payload while taking add-ons into consideration.
Yeah, I understand, that's typical of most sales people. It's not right, but it's typical.

I think it's a load of crap that when the order is put into the dealer's ordering program, the manufacturer can't give the customer a payload estimate that's within 5% of what the ultimate ratings will be once the truck is built. For pity's sake, they know everything about every component a customer orders, how much it weighs, etc. IMO it's lame that at the time the order is input they don't provide a decent estimate of payload...even if they only guarantee the estimates to be within +/- 10%, that would be good enough to make a buying decision based on payload & towing capacities the buyer expects they'll need.

The only thing I could suggest is find one or two trucks on the lot that are fairly close to what a person will be ordering, and look at the ratings placard on those similar trucks (by similar I mean cab type, bed length, engine size, 4WD/2WD, high-end trim or entry-level trim, heavily optioned or not, panoramic roof, etc.) Not 100% accurate, but a lot closer than just being given the maximum payload and towing figures from the advertising brochures/ads for the stripped-down, max towing configuration.
 

thabiiighomie

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Yeah, I understand, that's typical of most sales people. It's not right, but it's typical.

I think it's a load of crap that when the order is put into the dealer's ordering program, the manufacturer can't give the customer a payload estimate that's within 5% of what the ultimate ratings will be once the truck is built. For pity's sake, they know everything about every component a customer orders, how much it weighs, etc. IMO it's lame that at the time the order is input they don't provide a decent estimate of payload...even if they only guarantee the estimates to be within +/- 10%, that would be good enough to make a buying decision based on payload & towing capacities the buyer expects they'll need.

The only thing I could suggest is find one or two trucks on the lot that are fairly close to what a person will be ordering, and look at the ratings placard on those similar trucks (by similar I mean cab type, bed length, engine size, 4WD/2WD, high-end trim or entry-level trim, heavily optioned or not, panoramic roof, etc.) Not 100% accurate, but a lot closer than just being given the maximum payload and towing figures from the advertising brochures/ads for the stripped-down, max towing configuration.
I regret not looking at a single door jam sticker before purchasing mine. Buy hey, it is my first truck. Lesson learned.
 

Rustydodge

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That "built in" 400 lbs is "built in" to the calculated towing capacity, not the vehicles payload, or either of the GVWR or GCWR numbers. He does not have an extra 400 lbs of capacity hidden in those numbers.
Understood, that's why i stated the 400 lbs within the sentence that begins with "the tow rating for your truck". Technically though, it is built into the GCWR as calculated per j2807.
 

riccnick

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Understood, that's why i stated the 400 lbs within the sentence that begins with "the tow rating for your truck". Technically though, it is built into the GCWR as calculated per j2807.
Yes, maybe we're saying the same thing, but I wanted to specifically say that it being included means that you have to reduce the GCVWR or GVWR by that amount to get the true calculated payload and towing numbers. It being hidden does not help your GCVWR or GVWR, it only helps the calculated tow rating. The G-numbers are static totals. Period.
 

SilverSurfer15

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It immediately went off topic by the guys trying to defend their half ton towing. See that WASNT even the point of the post above mine or mine, it’s not about what these trucks can or can’t do. It’s about how we are NOW trying to design these 1500 series trucks to do way too much. 450 horsepower, tow 12k, be as big as a suburban, get 20+ mpg, etc.

First negative is price. Second is it will never do all those things well. It’s just not possible. And the only thing that’s really happening is the price is sky rocketing and the trucks are now the size of older 2500s.

To answer your boat question without further details, you are probably fine. 8k is kind of the upper limit to gas motor towing IMO, regardless of truck. Once you step off into the 10-12k range, you are really just hurting yourself not being in a diesel.

And then depending on size and rolling resistance as well, you need to just move into a 3/4 ton diesel.

As mentioned, boats are a little different than the goober who is towing some giant travel or enclosed trailer behind a small half ton truck and talking about how awesome it is. You see them, trailer is 10ft+ longer than f150 (they seem to be the number 1 offenders) and it’s slow, can’t brake, all over road.
 

Willwork4truck

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It depends on who is suing who, and for how much. As soon as any attorneys get involved, each one will look for whatever crack in the armor they can find to either get their client off, or limit their client's liability, depending on which side of the suing they are. If anyone involved went over the manufacturer's rated weight limits, it's an easy target for an attorney. It might not happen often, I'm just saying no one wants to be that guy that gets accused of going over the manufacturer's ratings if someone else got hurt.

I agree that the insurance companies should be more diligent in educating their customers about vehicle ratings/capacities and asking pointed questions in order to limit their liability. Then again, I've never read the fine print on any of my vehicle insurance policies, maybe the insurance company has a disclaimer in there somewhere about limiting their liability in the event the insured operates the vehicle in an unsafe manner, which would broadly include overloading the vehicle.
No fine print to that effect existed when I was in that job. Things can always change, so best read contracts! There are some states that require “easy to read” laymans language.
The only claims that were even questionable back when i was working were anything using the car as a weapon, and even then the courts overrulled us. Courts can nullify clauses and basically order coverage.
Im nor giving any legal advice, just saying that “unsafe operation” is one reason you have liability coverage.
A lot of accidents are caused by drowsyness, excess speed, dangerous conditions, unsafe vehicle components, driver inattention, taking the right a way or something else that is “unsafe”. They (almost) all get paid. Even DWI wrecks, and thats one of the most obvious things a person does...
 

devildodge

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An interesting read, about payload, GVWR, GCWR, exceeding capacity and the salesman experience.
 

J-Cooz

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Mine is 1180. Limited Long bed with skid plates, big tank, basically every option. Not a ton of payload but I don't plan on towing or hauling a ton. If I could another truck I'd try and make it a bit lighter.
 

slimchance

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when i went shopping for our 1500 trks we visited at least 4 dealers and each salesperson claimed to have over 7 yrs experience selling trks ..... NONE of them understood why i wanted to open the drivers door and look for a payload sticker ... they ALL claimed to never been asked to do that before .... my problem resulted from poor planning, i should have known within 6 months of purchasing my 1500 we would be purchasing a 5th whl camper .... next time ........
 

the wanderer

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when i went shopping for our 1500 trks we visited at least 4 dealers and each salesperson claimed to have over 7 yrs experience selling trks ..... NONE of them understood why i wanted to open the drivers door and look for a payload sticker ... they ALL claimed to never been asked to do that before .... my problem resulted from poor planning, i should have known within 6 months of purchasing my 1500 we would be purchasing a 5th whl camper .... next time ........
Saleman can say the funniest things; I wanted to test drive my custom order before signing off on it when it arrived, salesman goes "Nobody ever asked to do that before." Sure.
 

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