Really want to tow this trailer with a 2019 Ram 1500

devildodge

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Okay, maybe someone can help me, I am new to towing and really don't understand it. We are looking at buying a 2019 Dodge Ram Limited with the V8 and 3.92 rear axel. We are also purchasing a 20ft Enclosed Aluminum Tailer with an empty weight of 3200 lbs, dual 3500 lbs axels to haul our Slingshot which has a weight of about 2000 lbs. Can the truck we are looking at tow this configuration or do I need to look at the Ram 2500?
The 1500 should serve that purpose fine.
 

Jus Cruisin

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Okay, maybe someone can help me, I am new to towing and really don't understand it. We are looking at buying a 2019 Dodge Ram Limited with the V8 and 3.92 rear axel. We are also purchasing a 20ft Enclosed Aluminum Tailer with an empty weight of 3200 lbs, dual 3500 lbs axels to haul our Slingshot which has a weight of about 2000 lbs. Can the truck we are looking at tow this configuration or do I need to look at the Ram 2500?
Easy peasy.....

20190309_071605.jpg

20 foot v-nose probably 7500ish lbs. with my Camaro in it. Pulled this from Florida to Michigan about a month ago.
 

tkrpata

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Easy peasy.....

View attachment 30343

20 foot v-nose probably 7500ish lbs. with my Camaro in it. Pulled this from Florida to Michigan about a month ago.
That is exactly what I am planning on pulling with, 8.5 X 20 v-nose trailer with my Slingshot in it along with some tools, clothes, spare tire.
How did it handle in the mountains and any problems downhill with breaking or trying to push you?
 

Jus Cruisin

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That is exactly what I am planning on pulling with, 8.5 X 20 v-nose trailer with my Slingshot in it along with some tools, clothes, spare tire.
How did it handle in the mountains and any problems downhill with breaking or trying to push you?
No real mountains to go up or down between Florida and Michigan. No troubles whatsoever. Now I've done a fair amount of towing over the years I had a Class A license and dragged 53' trailers from coast to coast. The Rockies and like Donner Pass in the Sierra Nevada's are mountains. As long as you get your vehicle properly loaded front to back it'll tow fine. Semi's didn't phase me passing and it was windy to boot. Too little tongue weight and it'll wag you like crazy. Too much and front steering will be kind of sketchy with a crummy ride. You don't need a gob of tongue weight. You want to pull it, not carry it.
 
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tkrpata

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No real mountains to go up or down between Florida and Michigan. No troubles whatsoever. Now I've done a fair amount of towing over the years I had a Class A license and dragged 53' trailers from coast to coast. The Rockies and like Donner Pass in the Sierra Nevada's are mountains. As long as you get your vehicle properly loaded front to back it'll tow fine. Semi's didn't phase me passing and it was windy to boot. Too little tongue weight and it'll wag you like crazy. Too much and front steering will be kind of sketchy with a crummy ride. You don't need a gob of tongue weight. You want to pull it, not carry it.
Okay another question from the newbie, how do you determine tongue weight and find out if your under or over it?
 

riccnick

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Okay another question from the newbie, how do you determine tongue weight and find out if your under or over it?
Without a scale, it's all an estimate. If you know what your trailer weighs empty, and it's tongue weight, you can estimate what the tongue weight would be with the trailer loaded (evenly). However, if you really want to know, you have to weigh the truck and trailer.
 

devildodge

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Many threads about how to do it.

For bumper pull should be 10 to 12 %

Only way for sure is with a scale and a pipe or a CAT scale.
 

Jus Cruisin

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Okay another question from the newbie, how do you determine tongue weight and find out if your under or over it?
I go how I feel the nose drop as I'm driving the car in the trailer. The nose of the trailer will raise as you start in, then it'll drop back and stay kind of level for a couple of feet and then drop as you add weight to the tongue. I feel it drop a couple of inches and call it good. It doesn't need to be perfect. Because you don't have a bunch of experience and if the trailer dealer isn't too far from you, I'd take your slingshot over and have the store help you out. They'll have a scale. There seems like the slingshot has a lot of its weight over the rear. It might be best to back it in. That way you won't need to pull it way near the nose to get it balanced. If the center trailer spring perch is ****ed a bunch you're nose or tail heavy. You want the spring perch close to even. Once you get it positioned, put some tape on the floor to help you get it positioned right the next time.

I know the rule of thumb is 10%. I know I never come close to that with car trailers or boat trailers. With the open trailers I've had, I could watch the rear of the truck loading and I'd drop the rear of the truck about 2" from unloaded. I still do that with my enclosed trailers. If I put 700 lbs on my hitch I'd drop the rear of the truck probably 3+". Go to a bracket race at a drag strip and watch the pickups pulling race cars in. None use weight distribution hitches and none are sitting with the rears drooping except for the guys with big lifts. They are always seeming to have the headlights aimed at the trees because of the rear sagging.
 
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tkrpata

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I go how I feel the nose drop as I'm driving the car in the trailer. The nose of the trailer will raise as you start in, then it'll drop back and stay kind of level for a couple of feet and then drop as you add weight to the tongue. I feel it drop a couple of inches and call it good. It doesn't need to be perfect. Because you don't have a bunch of experience and if the trailer dealer isn't too far from you, I'd take your slingshot over and have the store help you out. They'll have a scale. There seems like the slingshot has a lot of its weight over the rear. It might be best to back it in. That way you won't need to pull it way near the nose to get it balanced. If the center trailer spring perch is ****ed a bunch you're nose or tail heavy. You want the spring perch close to even. Once you get it positioned, put some tape on the floor to help you get it positioned right the next time.

I know the rule of thumb is 10%. I know I never come close to that with car trailers or boat trailers. With the open trailers I've had, I could watch the rear of the truck loading and I'd drop the rear of the truck about 2" from unloaded. I still do that with my enclosed trailers. If I put 700 lbs on my hitch I'd drop the rear of the truck probably 3+". Go to a bracket race at a drag strip and watch the pickups pulling race cars in. None use weight distribution hitches and none are sitting with the rears drooping except for the guys with big lifts. They are always seeming to have the headlights aimed at the trees because of the rear sagging.
Thank you, some very good information, and believe it or not most of the Slingshot weight is over the front tires, that is where the engine is located
 

MQQSE

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I don't think being 2,000 lbs over capacity in your mega cab is a good example of how that truck, or any other truck should be used to tow over its capacity...

If you want your 99% truck as a daily driver, then get a 99% trailer, or borrow / rent the proper truck for those 1% days. Anyone who tows more than 3.65 days a year is using their truck more than 1% for towing, so I'd imagine those of us who just drop a trailer down at a campsite as seasonals are the only ones following the 99/1 rule. Everyone else should be looking at more capable trucks or lighter trailers.

Somehow, many of us are capable of living our lives within the capabilities of our trucks, with either the foresight to buy the proper truck, or the common sense and decency to pull the proper trailer with it. Not sure why this is so difficult for others. Not once has my life been significantly impeded by the lack of capability of my 8,000lb capacity truck to tow a 12,000lb trailer. Maybe I'm just lucky.
Sorry about the typo, I meant 7,800 pound trailer not 9,800. That's wet weight (fully loaded), and dry is like 6,500 pounds and change. I will say that truck could have towed 9,800 pounds though. It had a 3/4 ton frame and 3/4 ton axles with a 3:73 gearing. She was a good hauler.
NO I'm not ever saying to tow over the capacity of the truck, what I'm saying is you should look at what you use your truck for most of the time, not that one or two times when you haul something. When it comes to asking yourself "how much can I tow?" An 80% rule of the total maximum rating of your truck is a safe rule for everyone (except those that have not towed in the past). Meaning, if your truck is rated for 11,500 pounds towing, you can tow 9,200 pounds with no issues (travel trailer included). If you have a CDL like I do, and know how to tow or operate equipment, you can go up to 90% of the total truck's max rating - When at 90% that does not include a travel trailer, at that weight percentage on use flat trailer with no large sides to catch air.

I'll post a photo next time I hook up my trailer and also get a shot of the weight ratings from the trailer tag. I'll do that so everyone can see it is in fact 7,800 pounds wet. I want to make sure to calm those certain people out there in internet land that don't believe someone when they accidentally mis-post a number. I'm hooking it up August 25th, so will repost here.

Cheers
MQQSE
 

riccnick

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Sorry about the typo, I meant 7,800 pound trailer not 9,800. That's wet weight (fully loaded), and dry is like 6,500 pounds and change. I will say that truck could have towed 9,800 pounds though. It had a 3/4 ton frame and 3/4 ton axles with a 3:73 gearing. She was a good hauler.
NO I'm not ever saying to tow over the capacity of the truck, what I'm saying is you should look at what you use your truck for most of the time, not that one or two times when you haul something. When it comes to asking yourself "how much can I tow?" An 80% rule of the total maximum rating of your truck is a safe rule for everyone (except those that have not towed in the past). Meaning, if your truck is rated for 11,500 pounds towing, you can tow 9,200 pounds with no issues (travel trailer included). If you have a CDL like I do, and know how to tow or operate equipment, you can go up to 90% of the total truck's max rating - When at 90% that does not include a travel trailer, at that weight percentage on use flat trailer with no large sides to catch air.

I'll post a photo next time I hook up my trailer and also get a shot of the weight ratings from the trailer tag. I'll do that so everyone can see it is in fact 7,800 pounds wet. I want to make sure to calm those certain people out there in internet land that don't believe someone when they accidentally mis-post a number. I'm hooking it up August 25th, so will repost here.

Cheers
MQQSE
Thanks for the clarification, and I'm sure all of us look forward to the scale tickets. Seeing real numbers on real trucks helps a ton when gauging what's feasible and what's not.

I'll counter the other way to your argument now, lol. I don't need a CDL to tow 100% of what my truck is rated for, travel trailer or not. Numbers are numbers, and if my truck can tow 8k, then I'll tow up to that number without hesitation. Does my confidence come from experience (just as it would coming from having a CDL)? Yes, so, just like everything else, your (collective "you", not YOU you) experience may vary.
 

MQQSE

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Thanks for the clarification, and I'm sure all of us look forward to the scale tickets. Seeing real numbers on real trucks helps a ton when gauging what's feasible and what's not.

I'll counter the other way to your argument now, lol. I don't need a CDL to tow 100% of what my truck is rated for, travel trailer or not. Numbers are numbers, and if my truck can tow 8k, then I'll tow up to that number without hesitation. Does my confidence come from experience (just as it would coming from having a CDL)? Yes, so, just like everything else, your (collective "you", not YOU you) experience may vary.
When I say CDL, I'm basically saying I have multiple experiences with all sorts of heavy equipment to include 18 wheel fuel tanker, 18 wheel tractor trailer, etc. etc. Having a CDL keeps you actively towing multiple vehicles in most cases and it's all about experience both understanding the road, other drivers and your equipment. Not having a CDL doesn't mean you can't tow like a pro...the chances are just a lot less.

Anyway, here is my trailer weight decal and my truck hooked up to it. I was really impressed on how well the 1500 both did with the tongue weight and how it pulled. Keep in mind I also have a 2500 Cummins Megacab that is set up just for towing and hauling. So going into a 1500 gasser is extremely hard for me to swallow.
Thanks for the clarification, and I'm sure all of us look forward to the scale tickets. Seeing real numbers on real trucks helps a ton when gauging what's feasible and what's not.

I'll counter the other way to your argument now, lol. I don't need a CDL to tow 100% of what my truck is rated for, travel trailer or not. Numbers are numbers, and if my truck can tow 8k, then I'll tow up to that number without hesitation. Does my confidence come from experience (just as it would coming from having a CDL)? Yes, so, just like everything else, your (collective "you", not YOU you) experience may vary.
When I say CDL, I'm basically saying I have multiple experiences with all sorts of heavy equipment to include 18 wheel fuel tanker, 18 wheel tractor trailer, etc. etc. Having a CDL keeps you actively towing multiple vehicles in most cases and it's all about experience both understanding the road, other drivers and your equipment. Not having a CDL doesn't mean you can't tow like a pro...the chances are just a lot less.

Anyway, here is my trailer weight decal and my truck hooked up to it. I was really impressed on how well the 1500 both did with the tongue weight and how it pulled. Keep in mind I also have a 2500 Cummins Megacab that is set up just for towing and hauling. So going into a 1500 gasser is extremely hard for me to swallow.

IMG_0657.jpgIMG_0658.jpgIMG_0662.jpg
 

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