OFF Road Recovery Gear Opinion

DavidNJ

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Soft shackles won't give you a lifetime of use compared to steel. They are also more expensive for quality pieces. What they do give you is significant weight savings and ease of use. For casual users, they may be not be the best use of your hard earned dollars. But, if you want something light and durable, the soft shackle rules. TRE ( Tactical Recovery Equipment ) makes some quality gear, if looking.






The argument for soft shackles is there is not a heavy piece of steel flying around if a shackle or tow hook disconnects or comes apart or a tree or rope breaks. It is also softer on pieces it is connecting to. Give the cost of just travel to go off-road, plus starting with a $50k-$65k truck with another $2.5k of wheels and tires plus a lift/level...somehow this doesn't seem expensive. Then there are air compressors, tire deflators, traction mats, jacks (exhaust bags, bottle jacks, high jacks, the ARB hydraulic toe jack), etc....no shortage of things to spend money on.

Cable dampers are another think rarely discussed. I did see on video where the off-roader used 5lb ankle weights. They easily stay on the cable or rope and have the needed weight.
 

GraniteRam

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You'd be better off using something like in post #16. The hitch pin will bend more than likely the way you have pictured.
 
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cra1g

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You'd be better off using something like in post #16. The hitch pin will bend more than likely the way you have pictured.
^^^ This. It'll certainly work...once. But you could bend the pin enough that you have to cut it to get it out, or you could distort the shape of the holes or the receiver itself. The pin is a lot stronger against shearing (like when there's a shackle mount inserted in the receiver) than it is against bending.
 

cra1g

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I haven't looked but there is likely somewhere on the frame that one could attach a proper pull point. Unfortunately, most manufacturers do not account for pulling from the rear.
If you do this, it would be a good idea to use factory bolt holes, so that you don't weaken the frame by drilling or welding. It would also be a good idea to distribute the load across both rails instead of just one. I'll bet you could come up with something that will work, and I'll bet it will look suspiciously like the factory receiver hitch.
 

Jako

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^^^ This. It'll certainly work...once. But you could bend the pin enough that you have to cut it to get it out, or you could distort the shape of the holes or the receiver itself. The pin is a lot stronger against shearing (like when there's a shackle mount inserted in the receiver) than it is against bending.
Your advice is well received, there are better options.
Been there done that with a bolt as a hitch pin pulling out a stump and a concrete clothes line base. Hopefully I'm done with those type of "projects".
 

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