OFF Road Recovery Gear Opinion

HotHareSpey

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Looking at a hitch and strap - found these below on amazon

any thoughts? Or better recommendations


 

2019REBEL

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Have you used one? Looks sharp

Yes attached to my truck when I am not towing my Seadoo and have it attached all winter.

Check it out on my thread. Only thing I did with it was spray some gritty clear coat on it so I wouldn't slip on it in winter.

 

HotHareSpey

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Yes attached to my truck when I am not towing my Seadoo and have it attached all winter.

Check it out on my thread. Only thing I did with it was spray some gritty clear coat on it so I wouldn't slip on it in winter.


Thank you!!
 

Rob5589

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Be aware that tow hitches are not designed to pull against. It is safer to mount a pull attachment (hook, shackle) to the frame.
 

Rob5589

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Seems to me that's exactly what they're designed for.
A hitch is designed to tow a moveable object, not to pull against dead/stuck weight. They are also designed for gradually increasing resistance, not heavy jerking of vehicle recovery.
 

cra1g

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A hitch is designed to tow a moveable object, not to pull against dead/stuck weight. They are also designed for gradually increasing resistance, not heavy jerking of vehicle recovery.
A. that's why you use a recovery strap instead of a chain
B. in the absence of factory-installed recovery points, there's no place on the frame designed for that, either. I'll take my chances with the hitch.
 

Rob5589

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A. that's why you use a recovery strap instead of a chain
B. in the absence of factory-installed recovery points, there's no place on the frame designed for that, either. I'll take my chances with the hitch.
Actually, a kinetic rope is even better than a strap. TRE (Tactical Recovery Equipment) makes some high quality recovery gear, if interested.
You have to do what you are comfortable with. Just be aware that if the hitch lets loose, you don't want to be near it. I have seen it in person; it's sounds like a small bomb going off, flies spectacularly through the air, and damages the frame mounting point.
I haven't looked but there is likely somewhere on the frame that one could attach a proper pull point. Unfortunately, most manufacturers do not account for pulling from the rear.
 

19TXLimited

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Looking at a hitch and strap - found these below on amazon

any thoughts? Or better recommendations


I have the Motormic linked in your original post. Seems like a quality piece. Have not used this, but do have it on the back just in case and to block tailgaters if necessary.
 

CaptainCJ35

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Actually, a kinetic rope is even better than a strap. TRE (Tactical Recovery Equipment) makes some high quality recovery gear, if interested.
You have to do what you are comfortable with. Just be aware that if the hitch lets loose, you don't want to be near it. I have seen it in person; it's sounds like a small bomb going off, flies spectacularly through the air, and damages the frame mounting point.
I haven't looked but there is likely somewhere on the frame that one could attach a proper pull point. Unfortunately, most manufacturers do not account for pulling from the rear.
I'm still trying to get up to speed on all things "off road" and learning more every day, so sorry if this seems a bit pedantic. Could you explain this a little further?
  • Are you not supposed to pull out a stuck vehicle using your hitch with a recovery rope/strap? Or are you talking about if you're the stuck vehicle?
  • What difference is there in either case, aren't the loads and stresses ultimately shared between vehicles?
  • Isn't the tow hitch assembly connected at multiple points on both frame rails and distributing the load better than a single shackle or hook on the frame?
  • Are you advocating using the front tow hooks instead and reversing?
This just seem counter intuitive and contrary to what I understood.
 

HotHareSpey

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I’ve been pulling cars and trucks out for decades using a hitch receiver or front tow hooks and never had an issue - ever. Camel trophy and any of the Jeepers from Moab and Arizona will attest

rules to recovery:

Use low range always

Use opposite points of recovery when possible

If you have concerns over the strap or winch line breaking, place a towel or blanket or similar weighted object to mediate the recoil

shovel out or employ recovery tracks and adjust the front wheels of the stuck vehicle

when initiating the tension on the strap don’t gas the vehicle but make-a gradual recovery Not jerky on the pull

use your brain and keep everyone away from the action

Have fun and don’t freak out when things get banged up, dented, or broken. It is going to happen eventually if you put you and your vehicle off the main road and it isn’t a big deal unless you make it one - just be prepared and it’s best to have a second vehicle with you always if possible

take pics and brag :)
 

DavidNJ

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There are also aluminum recovery hitches, some designed for soft shackles. it is also possible to just run a soft shackle directly on the pin without a hitch.

MAXTRAX-Hitch-e1550619128746[1].jpg

As a sidebar, there are also aluminum wheels that use a soft shackle and replace a snatch block.

MAXTRAX-pulley-e1550619187210[1].jpeg
 

RichT

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I'm all-in on soft shackles, but will stick to steel shackles for snatch block connections when needed.

here's why

 

DavidNJ

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I'm all-in on soft shackles, but will stick to steel shackles for snatch block connections when needed.

here's why

Some soft shackles come with an anti-chafe cover. I wonder if that would make a difference.

D7CAF57F-7863-4087-971B-A1514BE3E302_1024x1024[1].jpeg
 

Rob5589

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Soft shackles won't give you a lifetime of use compared to steel. They are also more expensive for quality pieces. What they do give you is significant weight savings and ease of use. For casual users, they may be not be the best use of your hard earned dollars. But, if you want something light and durable, the soft shackle rules. TRE ( Tactical Recovery Equipment ) makes some quality gear, if looking.
 

Rob5589

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Some soft shackles come with an anti-chafe cover. I wonder if that would make a difference.

View attachment 40344
I looked but, couldn't find it. Basically, it was a video that showed how the "protective sheath" actually caused increased wear and eventually failure. what increases the wear on soft shackles is are sharp edges. Keep them smoothed and you'll have many years of use for the average user.
 

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