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Ceramic Coating Cost

securityguy

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Yes I stated my mistake, so I’m not sure why you reiterated that. However, 5 minutes is apparently too long to let that sit, because that’s what I did for each section.
The time on the vehicle is based on temp and humidity. The lower the temp, the longer it must sit on the paint. My point is directed to all considering doing this and not just you😉
 

SkeeterRAM

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The time on the vehicle is based on temp and humidity. The lower the temp, the longer it must sit on the paint. My point is directed to all considering doing this and not just you😉
Hence the reason "this guy" won't "try this at home". Too many types of ceramic coating products. Some only sold to professionals. Prep work is key and takes patience. Not in my wheelhouse. I'm going to a detailing professional.
 

djevox

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The time on the vehicle is based on temp and humidity. The lower the temp, the longer it must sit on the paint. My point is directed to all considering doing this and not just you😉
If you’re not talking to me, then don’t make the comment directly at me- it’s not that hard to be diplomatic, even if you think your right and others are wrong.
 

scottmoyer

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When doing the ceramic coating application, it's very similar to applying a light coat of wax. In higher temps, it may dry faster, but higher temps and higher humidity, it will take longer. I think all of the instructions state to wait until you see it start to rainbow, or flash.

When I did mine, the temps were in the upper 60s-low 70s with average Florida humidity. I started on a section of the fender, applied to the front half and checked it. By the time I finished applying to the second half of the fender, the front half was ready to be leveled. So about 1-2 minutes. It was the same on every panel. I applied to 1/2 the panel, then the second half, went back and leveled the 1st half, then the 2nd half. It was a simple process.

I also used two microfiber towels. The 1st was to do the primary leveling, the second was to buff. Both required the lightest of pressure. I was hesitant to begin, but after I started, I questioned why I waited so long to start.
 

Cajun_

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Yes I stated my mistake, so I’m not sure why you reiterated that. However, 5 minutes is apparently too long to let that sit, because that’s what I did for each section.
depends on what coating you are applying. Some you want to wipe away instantly, other you need to look for a rainbowing and other you want to look for a bubbling effect. It really all comes down to doing quality prep work and just doing what's written on the bottle.
 

djevox

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depends on what coating you are applying. Some you want to wipe away instantly, other you need to look for a rainbowing and other you want to look for a bubbling effect. It really all comes down to doing quality prep work and just doing what's written on the bottle.
I was only referring to Q2Rim that I applied based on my humidity and temperature at application, but that’s an excellent point. I thought I was doing the right thing and it turns out that if I just followed the instructions to “wipe off immediately”, then it would have been leveled before it was too late. Or at least, had a better chance.

On a different note and just speaking in general- I could have kept quiet about my mistake, but I wanted to illustrate how easy it is to make an error with coatings that bond to paint.
 

SnowBlaZR2

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Some people also find satisfaction in doing it, and actually pretty easy, just time consuming, i throw in some headphones and just zone out all day while doing it .

That said i would never want to do it for anyone else than my personal vehicles.
Yeah, I agree with this. "I can make more by paying someone else and working instead" doesn't mean anything to me. I work from home and spend enough time in my office and make enough money. Things like detailing my vehicles, loading my own ammo, cutting my own grass, etc are my time to get away from working to relax a bit.
 

jzinckgra

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I'm thinking of having the ceramic coating in the Spring, but would like to hear from people that have had it done professionally and whether it was worth the cost. What are the benefits? Would you have done it again? Anything else to consider?
 

securityguy

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I'm thinking of having the ceramic coating in the Spring, but would like to hear from people that have had it done professionally and whether it was worth the cost. What are the benefits? Would you have done it again? Anything else to consider?
My thoughts on DIY:
  1. Only do it if you have the right tools and products (if paint correction is required, a great polish and orbital polisher and the education to use it all)
  2. If you have the time and patience to spend on paint correction if it's truly needed
  3. If you have the time and patience to put on and take off the ceramic coating as instructed
  4. DIY products will generally last 2-3 years
  5. If you do not need to drive your vehicle for several days to allow the product to cure properly (applies to both DIY and professional)
  6. You can save thousands (based on where you live) if you DIY
  7. Ceramic coatings are <$100. A great polisher is $150 and great polish is $20 (if you even need it). For under a few hundred dollars, you can do this
Thoughts on professional:
  1. You can sit on your couch and let someone else do it
  2. If they TRULY use a professional grade product, it may last longer than 2 years
  3. You may get a 5 year warranty from a professional based on the grade of ceramic you select
  4. It will cost, for a high quality detailer using high quality products, anywhere from $1000-$3000
I, for one, enjoy working on my vehicles. My time is also VERY valuable, as some have stated, and I am in the top 5% of the US population when it comes to earnings. However, with that being said, I like doing it myself and the pride I have in completing the work and loving the results. Anyone with any commonsense and handiness can easily do this. Most shops pay their Paint Correction guy and Ceramic coating guy $15-$20/hr so this certainly is not rocket science or taboo. If your handy and like working on your vehicle...then do it. You can't mess it up as long as you follow the instructions and use a good quality products.

If you want to invest your time and resources elsewhere, and think your time is worth more than the cost of having it professionally done, then pay someone bookoo bucks to do it for you while you sit on the couch or do something else with your time. My time is certainly worth more. I just prefer to do it on my own...not being cheap...I just enjoy working on my vehicles.
 

jzinckgra

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My thoughts on DIY:
  1. Only do it if you have the right tools and products (if paint correction is required, a great polish and orbital polisher and the education to use it all)
  2. If you have the time and patience to spend on paint correction if it's truly needed
  3. If you have the time and patience to put on and take off the ceramic coating as instructed
  4. DIY products will generally last 2-3 years
  5. If you do not need to drive your vehicle for several days to allow the product to cure properly (applies to both DIY and professional)
  6. You can save thousands (based on where you live) if you DIY
  7. Ceramic coatings are
Thoughts on professional:
  1. You can sit on your couch and let someone else do it
  2. If they TRULY use a professional grade product, it may last longer than 2 years
  3. You may get a 5 year warranty from a professional based on the grade of ceramic you select
  4. It will cost, for a high quality detailer using high quality products, anywhere from $1000-$3000
I, for one, enjoy working on my vehicles. My time is also VERY valuable, as some have stated, and I am in the top 5% of the US population when it comes to earnings. However, with that being said, I like doing it myself and the pride I have in completing the work and loving the results. Anyone with any commonsense and handiness can easily do this. Most shops pay their Paint Correction guy and Ceramic coating guy $15-$20/hr so this certainly is not rocket science or taboo. If your handy and like working on your vehicle...then do it. You can't mess it up as long as you follow the instructions and use a good quality products.

If you want to invest your time and resources elsewhere, and think your time is worth more than the cost of having it professionally done, then pay someone bookoo bucks to do it for you while you sit on the couch or do something else with your time. My time is certainly worth more. I just prefer to do it on my own...not being cheap...I just enjoy working on my vehicles.
Thanks. Did your message get cut off on the DIY option as it starts at #12

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk
 

Saddlerocker

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So how long does a good ceramic coating last?
Im reading about 2-3years.
I figured I would do ceramic, but if it only lasts 2 years it seems way too expensive.
It seems like maintenance coatings sprayed by me would extend the life of it some.

Honestly with all the hype about ceramic coating and the cost I assumed it lasted like 10yrs
 

tommyxv

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So how long does a good ceramic coating last?
Im reading about 2-3years.
I figured I would do ceramic, but if it only lasts 2 years it seems way too expensive.
It seems like maintenance coatings sprayed by me would extend the life of it some.

Honestly with all the hype about ceramic coating and the cost I assumed it lasted like 10yrs

This is what got. They said limited lifetime warranty. lol Nothing lasts forever but if I get 6+ years, I'm good with that.

Wash and decontamination
Paint correction
4 layer of Ceramic Pro 9H on exposed paint
1 Layer of Ceramic Pro Light on exposed paint
1 layer of Ceramic Pro 9H and Light on exterior Plastic
1 layer of Ceramic Pro Wheel and Caliper on wheel faces
1 layer of Ceramic Pro Rain on all glass
 

securityguy

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This is what got. They said limited lifetime warranty. lol Nothing lasts forever but if I get 6+ years, I'm good with that.

Wash and decontamination
Paint correction
4 layer of Ceramic Pro 9H on exposed paint
1 Layer of Ceramic Pro Light on exposed paint
1 layer of Ceramic Pro 9H and Light on exterior Plastic
1 layer of Ceramic Pro Wheel and Caliper on wheel faces
1 layer of Ceramic Pro Rain on all glass
Based on the product used, and the quality of the prep, it's not unrealistic at all to expect it to last 5 years or so.
 

AngelPhoenix

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Based on the product used, and the quality of the prep, it's not unrealistic at all to expect it to last 5 years or so.
I would think it would also depend on where you live too, no?

Someone with mild to moderate temperatures and weather for most or all of the year will probably see it last longer than someone with really hot summers, really cold winters, and all the fun weather associated.
 

securityguy

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I would think it would also depend on where you live too, no?

Someone with mild to moderate temperatures and weather for most or all of the year will probably see it last longer than someone with really hot summers, really cold winters, and all the fun weather associated.
Not sure climate really matters. It is a ceramic and, whether you see extreme winters or hot summers, the ceramic itself should not be overly impacted. I think it has more to do with the quality of the ceramic chosen and the application than it does climate.
 

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