A Comprehensive Guide to Towing with the 2019 RAM 1500 - Everything You Need to Know!

Ramit392

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Not to be taking away from the informative post but when you get down to fine nitty gritty so to speak to minus more payload weight would be rather your gas tank is full 26 0r 33 gallons ,radiator, oil and Windshield washer fluids,air pressures in tires!! No one is going to push the issues of weight tables unless there is some with grossly over weights trucks being a 1500,2500 or 3500, in a very serious accident.I seriously doubt one out 10 people who are loaded with a non-commercial trucks knows their weight limitations down to the wire! Not trying to take away from the informative post of weight tables but just speaking in terms of the real world for 95% who tow with a their trucks.
 

slimchance

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am shopping for a 5th whl the last few days and 2 different RV dealers here in Pa warned me about going over the payload and GCVW rating for my trk ... these dealers were miles apart and each said the state cops have taken up the issue of overloaded pickup trks pulling trailers and travel trailers ... i don't know where they get their information but i have to wonder what advantage to their business they have in telling me this, they both had units in stock ... i was looking at models that would get me right around my weight limits and the short of their warning was don't go overboard
 

devildodge

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said the state cops have taken up the issue of overloaded pickup trks pulling trailers and travel trailers
This is the exact reason why I started my thread will the 1500 work for me or am I waiting on a 2500.

I made that decision.

Now I am debating weight class issues. I always just thought about the GVWR, but I have come to find it is GCWR. That is alot more money...but of I have seen and heard about the scale patrol and I am not sure were I am going with this thought.

Most say it doesn't matter, they never check. But lately they have...

Haven't seen them yet this year and the ones I have seen have had very obvious trucks pulled over.

Guess these are the chances we take and the decisions we have to accept the consequences of.
 

MG99

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DEEEEFD1-11C7-4210-98C8-FA2C3F005CFF.jpeg
Been reading through all these posts. Lots of information to digest, so thank you, but math (or towing) isn’t my thing. Here’s my sticker. I understand payload. Can someone please just tell me how much I can safely tow and what type of hitch and ball I should start with in the event I want to use a small/med cargo trailer?
 

MG99

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...Woops, realized I need a pic of the other sticker. I’ll do that tomorrow.
 

slimchance

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Can someone please just tell me how much I can safely tow and what type of hitch and ball I should start with in the event I want to use a small/med cargo trailer?
your experience with trailers is a BIG factor in "how much you can safely tow" .. first you can use a standard 2" receiver hitch, make sure the ball is the highest weight capacity for a 2" ball, i think 9,000 #s, i have both a 1,500 # aluminum utility trailer (for smaller tasks) and a dual axel 7,000 # aluminum utility trailer (for heavier jobs) .. the key to using a utility trailer is how you load the stuff, the farther front on the trailer the heavier the tongue weight and the less stable the trailer ... practice backing using your mirrows ALOT until you know what you are doing and only back a trailer as far as you NEED to before moving forward
 

devildodge

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...Woops, realized I need a pic of the other sticker. I’ll do that tomorrow.
Just need two things...4x2 or 4x4 this gives the GVWR (6900 or 7100). Next question is to just makesure you have the class IV reciever (some do not as it isn't standard on bighorn)

Then your 3.21 rear gear gives you a GCWR 13900.

Once you get your drive listed...take GVWR-1777(your payload) and that gives you base weight.

Take GVWR(13900)- base weight this gives you maximum (not a real useable number) trailer.

BUT, you then have to take trailer-your added payload to get the trailer weight you can tow.

Now, you then can go buy your Hitch with the proper drop (top of reciever height-trailer tongue height) and weight capacity.

Then get your proper trailer ball size.

The lowest of these numbers is the largest trailer you can tow.
Ball capacity, hitch capacity, reciever hitch capacity, trailer capacity.

Good luck.

Tow what you feel comfortable, be comfortable while towing.
 

MG99

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Thank you gentlemen for your responses. I have a class IV receiver and 4x4.
 

pgienger

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I wish this type of post was in the FB group I lurk in for my brand of travel trailer. It would clearly shut down a lot of arguments that get way out of hand if people just read a bit and understood the numbers. Also, you could just not ask your dealer to give you a payload number, just ask him to open the door and you'll find out for yourself... I'm seeking deals from area dealers right now, and if the last message I sent out comes back with a 'yellow sticker' number, I may just give them the business even if they're a bit higher out of respect.

As for the 5th wheel question, just don't. I'm actually surprised that the dealer turned you down, but good on them. There isn't a 'half ton' 5th wheel out there that will suit a Ram. Don't get me wrong, I love my 2011 and will love the 2019 I have yet to order, but they are not payload kings. One manufacturer, Keystone I think, does it right and calls them the 150 line, because they're made for a max-payload F150. Ford does something none of the other MFGs do and actually build a half ton for high payload. In the FB group I lurk around, you'll see people with this config and it's ~800lbs higher than w/o. Those half-ton 5ers will max you out on their pin just at dry-weight. Then you couldn't get in to drive, or put anything in that front basement, which is huge for a 5th wheel.

I would have to believe that the LEOs out there are really looking for the obvious infractions, like half ton 5th wheels, some with boats, or 30'+ that are really squatting. I like to think they like to razz the folks pulling something clearly not business related with a "business" pickup just to give them a hard time, but it probably doesn't happen. You know the guy, used a write-off from his CPA business to buy that $80k limited 2500 and pulls a toy hauler, but now should have to obey commercial vehicle regulations.
 

slimchance

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i also do not visit the FB stuff .... i call it "antisocal" media because in the days i look thru FB it seemed like a forum for complainers to attack something/some one
 

the wanderer

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As a newbie to towing anything bigger than a little utility trailer; thanks for all the information. It's still a little confused in my mind.

devildodge had some formulas there, would anybody here be able to create a small excel spreadsheet where we can type in our numbers from our truck door jamb, and then we get the other numbers calculated automatically from that? Or is that making things more difficult than they need to be?

I'd be we willing to create the spreadsheet and share it here if somebody can give me a list of every relevant formula.

I'm also wondering about the comments around 5th wheels and half tons. I've seen smaller 5th wheels with dry weight between 6000 - 8000 pounds, what makes those unsuitable to be towed by a 1500? Do they (5th wheels) have more than the usual 10% tongue weight that a TT does?
 

Gondul

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As a newbie to towing anything bigger than a little utility trailer; thanks for all the information. It's still a little confused in my mind.

devildodge had some formulas there, would anybody here be able to create a small excel spreadsheet where we can type in our numbers from our truck door jamb, and then we get the other numbers calculated automatically from that? Or is that making things more difficult than they need to be?

I'd be we willing to create the spreadsheet and share it here if somebody can give me a list of every relevant formula.

I'm also wondering about the comments around 5th wheels and half tons. I've seen smaller 5th wheels with dry weight between 6000 - 8000 pounds, what makes those unsuitable to be towed by a 1500? Do they (5th wheels) have more than the usual 10% tongue weight that a TT does?

For a very simple spreadsheet, you can use this one http://www.keepyourdaydream.com/payload/

No one is really going to tow anything dry... well, maybe the day you buy it and pick it up, but after that it will be loaded with stuff.
I used the GVWR and used 12-13% TW based on someone's comment (I forget who) and used that number to figure if I could tow.
 

pgienger

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To tag onto the 5th wheel problem, you also have to look at the storage inside and outside. Unless we're talking about bunkhouse models, which is almost never a 5er, the storage is always up front, right under the inside stairs. We haven't even added on the 5th wheel plate, which I've heard is well north of 100lbs.

The FB group I'm talking about is usually pretty good about staying civil and discussion about mods and common fixes for our camper brand. The moderators have started locking flammable towing posts tho to keep it friendly. Lots of butthurt in the winter when people get cabin fever.
 

o0Gryphon0o

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Love this post and this write up. Looks like my 2019 Big Horn has a payload of 1644 #'s and a base weight of 5456 #'s going by the stickers on the door jamb.
 

Willwork4truck

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Just a comment on payloads. First, I was a liability (its called casualty) adjuster for a major company for 9 years from 1982-1991. Took care of the claims and eventual bodily injury lawsuits of hundreds if not thousands of accidents during those years. We never weighed our insured’s rigs or even cared about the payload or trailer weight. Our contract was to indemnify the insured due to a covered loss. Didnt say anything about safe tires, under or at payload gcvwr, having working windshield wipers, none of that nonsense. We paid the claim and if underwriting felt the insured posed an excessive risk of a repeat loss, we would either uprate or non-renew.

Now what LEO does or does not do on the criminal side due to citations is/was their business. We paid out on DWI/DUI wrecks all day long, no matter if our insured got cited or not. We adjusters always wished there was a “stupidity” clause which would have eliminated a majority of claims... but there wasn’t.

I have seen one instance where a highway patrol/DOT had moving scales out on the side of the road and had waived in large rv’s and class A’s, probably because they appeared to be over the states’ 26,000 lb class A or B non-commercial license required rule. Some states (13 as of 2017) are requiring these licenses, and with good reason as the big diesel pusher 40’ bus class A’s are something the average class C or D (car) driver has no clue how to handle. LEO’s can check for unsafe conditions (tow chains, lights, operating trailer brakes) and cite you for operating an unsafe vehicle however its usually not a “primary” reason to stop you, being “secondary” they have to find some other moving violation first. Remember that’s a totally separate area from your insurance company contract.

Please stop believing and/or repeating the myth of “overweight vehicle chasing attorneys” and insurance companies denying the claims due to overweight personal pickup trucks. It makes for great “weight police” warnings and hype but its false. Now if you are a licensed commercial entity, you fall under a completely different (stricter) set of rules.

All operators are supposed to know the limits of their equipment and thats a reasonable requirement. People generally want to tow with a comfortable ride daily driver instead of a purpose built heavy 3/4 to 1 ton or more truck. Understandable. People will also “push the envelope” and tow overweight a few times a year cause’ they can. That’s people.

The OP’s article is educating owners as to the limits of their (mostly 1500 series) pickups. Bravo. Just remember it applies the same to 2500 and 3500 series as well. Look at the weight of modern multi-slide equipped truck campers that are 10-12’ long and see just what kind of payload is required. That’s scary! Here’s an example: (truckcampermagazine.com, 2019)
Lance 1172 truck camper: dry weight, 4,174 pounds + 42 gallons fresh, 350.3 pounds + 6 gallon full hot water heater, 50 pounds + 2x 30-pound full propane tanks, 54 pounds + 2 batteries, 130 pounds + stuff, 500 pounds = 5,213.3 pounds
Put that on your 1500 and see what happens...
 

Ramit392

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Just a comment on payloads. First, I was a liability (its called casualty) adjuster for a major company for 9 years from 1982-1991. Took care of the claims and eventual bodily injury lawsuits of hundreds if not thousands of accidents during those years. We never weighed our insured’s rigs or even cared about the payload or trailer weight. Our contract was to indemnify the insured due to a covered loss. Didnt say anything about safe tires, under or at payload gcvwr, having working windshield wipers, none of that nonsense. We paid the claim and if underwriting felt the insured posed an excessive risk of a repeat loss, we would either uprate or non-renew.

Now what LEO does or does not do on the criminal side due to citations is/was their business. We paid out on DWI/DUI wrecks all day long, no matter if our insured got cited or not. We adjusters always wished there was a “stupidity” clause which would have eliminated a majority of claims... but there wasn’t.

I have seen one instance where a highway patrol/DOT had moving scales out on the side of the road and had waived in large rv’s and class A’s, probably because they appeared to be over the states’ 26,000 lb class A or B non-commercial license required rule. Some states (13 as of 2017) are requiring these licenses, and with good reason as the big diesel pusher 40’ bus class A’s are something the average class C or D (car) driver has no clue how to handle. LEO’s can check for unsafe conditions (tow chains, lights, operating trailer brakes) and cite you for operating an unsafe vehicle however its usually not a “primary” reason to stop you, being “secondary” they have to find some other moving violation first. Remember that’s a totally separate area from your insurance company contract.

Please stop believing and/or repeating the myth of “overweight vehicle chasing attorneys” and insurance companies denying the claims due to overweight personal pickup trucks. It makes for great “weight police” warnings and hype but its false. Now if you are a licensed commercial entity, you fall under a completely different (stricter) set of rules.

All operators are supposed to know the limits of their equipment and thats a reasonable requirement. People generally want to tow with a comfortable ride daily driver instead of a purpose built heavy 3/4 to 1 ton or more truck. Understandable. People will also “push the envelope” and tow overweight a few times a year cause’ they can. That’s people.

The OP’s article is educating owners as to the limits of their (mostly 1500 series) pickups. Bravo. Just remember it applies the same to 2500 and 3500 series as well. Look at the weight of modern multi-slide equipped truck campers that are 10-12’ long and see just what kind of payload is required. That’s scary! Here’s an example: (truckcampermagazine.com, 2019)
Lance 1172 truck camper: dry weight, 4,174 pounds + 42 gallons fresh, 350.3 pounds + 6 gallon full hot water heater, 50 pounds + 2x 30-pound full propane tanks, 54 pounds + 2 batteries, 130 pounds + stuff, 500 pounds = 5,213.3 pounds
Put that on your 1500 and see what happens...
So very well done and in real world how it is. Hope all of us stay safe and do not over load our trucks to where its so bad you,your family and others are at risk. And not to be rude or obstinate but for some while on the road who pass me and my Family on the freeway with a 4 and 3 wheeled 5th wheel camper on the back of your 3/4 tons and 1 tons at 85 to 90 MPH I'm not impressed at all....I pray for all you could hurt or take life which even could be your own family as well as others is totally out of line just to show off! Every time I pull the camper or the pontoon out on the freeway it happens more more it seems and scares the bejebbies out me. ):
 
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