Valve stem caps - beware of aluminum

Jako

Ram Guru
Messages
832
Reaction score
367
Points
63
Purchased a second hand set of 20" Laramie wheels for my Bighorn. The tires came with aluminum valve stem covers. Didn't put any thought into the valve stems at the time. Today I went to check the air pressure and "galvanic reaction" had set in. Not a good moment. I managed to get them off holding the valve stems with some "toothy" pliers and a ratchet on the hex head caps. I believe the time frame was 80 days or less between valve cap removals.

FYI Galvanic Reaction Chart

Seems ebay is loaded with aluminum valve stem caps
 

Jako

Ram Guru
Messages
832
Reaction score
367
Points
63
Hmm, thanks for the update. I have good old cheap plastic ones...
Plastic is good, wish that was my case. Had my first experience with galvanic reaction over 40 years ago when trying to paint an exposed brass water pipe and found the slightest water leak at a capped T with a steel plug. Today it appears some brass is being eliminated in favor of aluminum for garden hose fittings, those will go bad if left together.
 

Dr. Jim

Ram Guru
Messages
603
Reaction score
379
Points
63
I just keep using the plastic caps so I hadn't even thought about galvanic reaction. Thanks for the heads up. (y)
 

Damion

Well-Known Member
Messages
209
Reaction score
119
Points
43
I like to put a thin film of petroleum jelly on the valve stem threads before putting those fancy caps on.
 

SD Rebel

Ram Guru
Messages
1,077
Reaction score
678
Points
113
Location
San Diego, CA
I guess that's why so many OEM valve caps are plastic, makes sense regarding corrosion. I always thought it was related to weight throwing off the wheel balance, unless they were on there the last time they were balanced.
 

Jako

Ram Guru
Messages
832
Reaction score
367
Points
63
I like to put a thin film of petroleum jelly on the valve stem threads before putting those fancy caps on.
I just put "never seize" for copper on them and left them loose for "salt season" storage. Wish me luck as I have no idea if it will work as there is also "never seize" for aluminum. No idea if either works under these circumstances. Tried teflon paste on garden hose connections and I do not recommended it. The plastic ram valve stem caps are not standard and are longer to add more to this equation. I will be going to plastic as per OEM.

Just an FYI
I have a delta single lever shower diverter. Slight drip, so I went to change the washer. Tried to undo by unscrewing and I broke one of the sweat fittings on the diverter. Actually had to hack saw and chisel the piece off. My shut offs are 20 year old globe valves and the washers are shot so I could not isolate the shower / tub without changing the washers. All day Saturday affair plus. Copper never seize is now part of my arsenal as well as shut offs for the shower/tub with wall access panels. Shut offs for the sink and toilet but not the shower! Live and learn.
From what I can remember there are you tube videos - I'm not alone.
 

Damion

Well-Known Member
Messages
209
Reaction score
119
Points
43
i use petroleum jelly on my garden hose stuff too. Around here combatting corrosion is a way of life. Even the air has enough salt in it to rust / corrode anything. Gotta love the North Atlantic and being about a mile and a half from the ocean
 

Jako

Ram Guru
Messages
832
Reaction score
367
Points
63
i use petroleum jelly on my garden hose stuff too. Around here combatting corrosion is a way of life. Even the air has enough salt in it to rust / corrode anything. Gotta love the North Atlantic and being about a mile and a half from the ocean
Works well on dissimilar metals or you use it on similar metals? Never thought of using Vaseline for something like that. I think years ago it was a go to product. Have a small container from I don't when or where in my "tool cabinet". I'll give it a try. Thanks for the info.
 

Damion

Well-Known Member
Messages
209
Reaction score
119
Points
43
I use it on anything I want to take apart thats exposed to the elements and don't want to deal with the mess and smell of hard grease.
 

jdmartin

Ram Guru
Messages
609
Reaction score
563
Points
93
Location
Southeast
Works well on dissimilar metals or you use it on similar metals? Never thought of using Vaseline for something like that. I think years ago it was a go to product. Have a small container from I don't when or where in my "tool cabinet". I'll give it a try. Thanks for the info.
A jar of Vaseline should be on every work bench. It is useful in so many situations I am surprised more people don't have it handy. Light coating to prevent corrosion, like on battery terminals or raw metal, thread lubricant when unsure what the proper grease is, O-ring lube, etc. I have all kinds of "proper" lubricants but still use it often because it is handy, doesn't stink, is inert, and safe.
 

Jako

Ram Guru
Messages
832
Reaction score
367
Points
63
Further Information on TPMS caps:
"The valve stem caps and cores used are specifically designed for the tire pressure monitoring sensors. Although similar to standard valve stem caps and cores, they are different. The valve stem cap has a special seal inside to keep moisture and corrosion out. The valve stem core has a special nickel coating to protect from corrosion. "
From: https://5thgenrams.com/community/threads/lower-tpms-setting.16203/
 

Attachments

Jako

Ram Guru
Messages
832
Reaction score
367
Points
63
I was having a hard time locating the larger size TPM valve stem caps on the Ram and ordered some valve stems on ebay to get the caps. Happened to be in PEP Boys today and they were in store for I believe $2.99.
 

Ramster

Active Member
Messages
54
Reaction score
27
Points
18
AEROSHELL 33MS works. Ask any AR-15 builder and they will tell you.
 

Maconi

Active Member
Messages
126
Reaction score
80
Points
28
I made that mistake on an old car a while back. I was able to get 2 off with some pliers. The other 2 I had to cut off with a small dremel cutting wheel. I accidentally cut into the threads/stem on 1 tire and had to have the entire stem replaced. Not making that mistake ever again lol.
 

Jako

Ram Guru
Messages
832
Reaction score
367
Points
63
I made that mistake on an old car a while back. I was able to get 2 off with some pliers. The other 2 I had to cut off with a small dremel cutting wheel. I accidentally cut into the threads/stem on 1 tire and had to have the entire stem replaced. Not making that mistake ever again lol.
While having a car inspected I discussed this topic with the mechanics. I was surprised that it was more common than I would have thought and they shared similar experiences as yours.
 

tcm4950

5thGenRams Supporter
Site Supporter
Messages
65
Reaction score
51
Points
18
Location
north georgia
Purchased a second hand set of 20" Laramie wheels for my Bighorn. The tires came with aluminum valve stem covers. Didn't put any thought into the valve stems at the time. Today I went to check the air pressure and "galvanic reaction" had set in. Not a good moment. I managed to get them off holding the valve stems with some "toothy" pliers and a ratchet on the hex head caps. I believe the time frame was 80 days or less between valve cap removals.

FYI Galvanic Reaction Chart

Seems ebay is loaded with aluminum valve stem caps
Interesting read
 

tcm4950

5thGenRams Supporter
Site Supporter
Messages
65
Reaction score
51
Points
18
Location
north georgia
Forgot to add. They are copper not aluminum if that matters. Also I ran this companies valve stem caps on 2 different BMW'S and 1 Porsche for over 14 years, never had any problems with TPS or corrosion. But eventually the ram logo will fall out and I will take them off by hand and throw them away LoL
 

Jako

Ram Guru
Messages
832
Reaction score
367
Points
63
Forgot to add. They are copper not aluminum if that matters. Also I ran this companies valve stem caps on 2 different BMW'S and 1 Porsche for over 14 years, never had any problems with TPS or corrosion. But eventually the ram logo will fall out and I will take them off by hand and throw them away LoL
Post 1 - chart, no problem brass and copper.
Pretty easy for people to put the two dissimilar metals (aluminum and brass) together as aluminum caps are for sale all over and are a cheap "customization". It could create a serious headache/problem if they just needed to add air in an interim fix for an air leak.

Sounds like you buy quality caps.
 

Trooper4

Well-Known Member
Messages
289
Reaction score
183
Points
43
Plastic is good, wish that was my case. Had my first experience with galvanic reaction over 40 years ago when trying to paint an exposed brass water pipe and found the slightest water leak at a capped T with a steel plug. Today it appears some brass is being eliminated in favor of aluminum for garden hose fittings, those will go bad if left together.
Really dislike the aluminum fittings on hoses. Just too soft a metal. Good old brass worked for years. A cost move I'm sure.
 
Top