Thoughts on running Water Wetter in the cooling system?

Firebird

Well-Known Member
Messages
289
Reaction score
213
Points
43
Here in Florida, where it is hotter than the back side of Hades most of the year, I used to run some Water Wetter in all of my old cars. That stuff was crazy effective, and really worked magic on my old high compression Ram Air GTO motor! Would there be any issues running it in our modern computer controlled trucks? These 102 degree days are just murder.

 

Firebird

Well-Known Member
Messages
289
Reaction score
213
Points
43
Why? Modern engines run hotter than your old GTO. That is the way they are designed.
Mostly just curious as to whether or not it would reduce temps (in modern engines), or if it would cause problems. As far as Florida goes, a cooler engine and radiator, equals a better AC system too.
 

SD Rebel

Ram Guru
Messages
572
Reaction score
324
Points
63
Location
San Diego, CA
I wouldn't. I personally like to set my gauges so I see the actual temps, your engine runs at its most efficient with coolant temps around 220 - 230. I doubt your high temps in your area is going to effect that.

Go ahead and set your gauges up so you can see your actual coolant temp, see where it averages during your drive. Should maintain around 220 - 230. Expect your oil temps to be around there as well.
 

Rob5589

Ram Guru
Messages
569
Reaction score
384
Points
63
Location
California
We don't have FL humidity but at 110 degrees outside mine never got over 211, oil a touch below. WW goes waaay back to when cooling systems were poor or not adequate for it's application.
 

geotex1

Well-Known Member
Messages
470
Reaction score
412
Points
63
Location
Mtns of PA
Research what the factory fill is, and you should arrive at your answer as to whether you want to add anything.
 

Billet1500 4x4

Ram Guru
Messages
924
Reaction score
660
Points
93
Location
Central California
Here in Florida, where it is hotter than the back side of Hades most of the year, I used to run some Water Wetter in all of my old cars. That stuff was crazy effective, and really worked magic on my old high compression Ram Air GTO motor! Would there be any issues running it in our modern computer controlled trucks? These 102 degree days are just murder.

Here's the MSDS on waterwetter. Basically alcohol and a couple of corrosion inhibitors. The alcohol will reduce the surface tension where the cooling medium contacts the metal surfaces of the cooling system reducing small air bubbles thus making the surface "wetter" since water has 4 times the heat capacity of air, eliminating the air increases the heat transfer capability of the system. The corrosion inhibitors molybdate for steel and tolytriazole for copper will already be in the OAT coolant already mixed in from the factory. It will have no affect if your coolant temperature is already at or near the thermostat control temp. It's primary purpose is for track cars that are not allowed to run a glycol anti-freeze, it will have a greater affect on old cooling systems that are prone to having air in the cooling system. The cooling system on these trucks is pretty robust and I'd be willing to bet you would see little to no difference in your Ram.
 

Attachments

StuartV

Well-Known Member
Messages
474
Reaction score
269
Points
63
Location
Manassas, VA
One, WW won't keep your engine from freezing when it gets cold. I don't know where in FL you are, but it does get well below freezing in north FL in the winter.

Two, it will give FCA all the excuse they need to void your engine warranty.

Three, modern engines are designed with sophisticated temperature management systems. It's going to run itself at whatever temperature the engineers decided was optimum - if it possibly can. Most likely, it will run at the same temp with WW as it does with the spec coolant. If it doesn't, then that would indicate that WW is so far outside the operating parameters that the engine is designed for that I would be concerned about engine damage (long-term).

Four, it would not surprise me if the spec coolant has some properties of lubrication to things like water pump seals. Properties that WW likely does not have. Thus, it would not surprise me if long-term use of WW did not result in water pump (or other) seal failure.

I have run WW extensively in my racebikes in the past. To me, it is like race compound tires. Better for the track. Actually not as good as manufacturer spec for street use.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Site Vendors

Top