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Diesel Fuel and Anti-Gel

RAMKing1

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My Rebel w/ Ecodiesel is hopefully going to be at the dealer next week and after the last week and next week's forecast in NY, it is COLD. This is my first diesel and I've heard of places selling a winter blend but when I asked the guy at BJ's gas station what they sold all he could say was it was diesel.

- How do you know if fuel from the pump has some winter blend to stop gelling? All stations I saw a pump didn't have anything on the pump that said winter blend.
- If not sure, should I just add some Anti-Gel or is it bad for the motor to add it to fuel that may be already treated?
- Anyone in Orange county NY area have a station they recommend to buy diesel?
 

NorthStar

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My Rebel w/ Ecodiesel is hopefully going to be at the dealer next week and after the last week and next week's forecast in NY, it is COLD. This is my first diesel and I've heard of places selling a winter blend but when I asked the guy at BJ's gas station what they sold all he could say was it was diesel.

- How do you know if fuel from the pump has some winter blend to stop gelling? All stations I saw a pump didn't have anything on the pump that said winter blend.
- If not sure, should I just add some Anti-Gel or is it bad for the motor to add it to fuel that may be already treated?
- Anyone in Orange county NY area have a station they recommend to buy diesel?
I'd recommend the Sam's Club in Wallkill or the Pilot Travel Center at Newburgh, NY.
 

jmt8706

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I always added Power Service to my tanks when I had a diesel. Better than guessing, or getting a really cold snap and the fuel gelling if you need to get somewhere quick.

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c3k

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My Rebel w/ Ecodiesel is hopefully going to be at the dealer next week and after the last week and next week's forecast in NY, it is COLD. This is my first diesel and I've heard of places selling a winter blend but when I asked the guy at BJ's gas station what they sold all he could say was it was diesel.

- How do you know if fuel from the pump has some winter blend to stop gelling? All stations I saw a pump didn't have anything on the pump that said winter blend.
- If not sure, should I just add some Anti-Gel or is it bad for the motor to add it to fuel that may be already treated?
- Anyone in Orange county NY area have a station they recommend to buy diesel?

You're probably good...but I understand your concern. Bring a mason jar there, fill it with fuel, and set it out overnight. Take another one and put it in freezer with a thermometer. See if one or the other (both?) show any clouding. Diesel fuel will cloud before it freezes. That cloudiness indicates that the waxy paraffins are coming out of the fuel. That is what gels. (<- rough, but close)

So, no cloudiness, you're fine.

Now, having said that, I always add some cetane boost/conditioner to my diesel fuel. YMMV. (<- I'm on a roll! :) ) You do that for lubrication, gelling, cleaning and cetane boost (think octane boost) reasons. There are a lot of good ones out there. I use Amsoil and Power Service Diesel Kleen, depending which diesel vehicle of mine we're talking about.

TL:DR; don't worry about it, but find a diesel additive to use religiously for reasons other than gelling/freezing.
 

mrfreon

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I placed a gallon of diesel from the local truck stop in a clear plastic jug in my freezer at -15 F over the weekend and you could clearly see the paraffin wax cloud was about 25% of the total volume.
The I repeated the test using the labeled amount of Amsoil Cold Flow and the was cloud was nearly non-existent.
 
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RAMKing1

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I placed a gallon of diesel from the local truck stop in a clear plastic jug in my freezer at -15 F over the weekend and you could clearly see the paraffin wax cloud was about 25% of the total volume.
The I repeated the test using the labeled amount of Amsoil Cold Flow and the was cloud was nearly non-existent.
That sounds like a good science experiment.
 

RAMKing1

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The Northeast is all on winter blend, you're fine.
I'm about an hour north of NYC but this week we've seen some single digits and when we go upstate we've seen some negative days. I just wish the gas stations would post something about it because employees don't know. I may hit up a truck stop off the highway and see if they know more.
 

djevox

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I'm about an hour north of NYC but this week we've seen some single digits and when we go upstate we've seen some negative days. I just wish the gas stations would post something about it because employees don't know. I may hit up a truck stop off the highway and see if they know more.
I gave you what you needed to know in that article, but I can say it here. Winter fuel is a mix of #1 and #2 fuel that helps in lowering the cold filter plugging point. There’s no anti-gel additives in it.
 

c3k

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I gave you what you needed to know in that article, but I can say it here. Winter fuel is a mix of #1 and #2 fuel that helps in lowering the cold filter plugging point. There’s no anti-gel additives in it.

Yep, he gave some good stuff.

Here are some more links: https://www.dieselpowerproducts.com/blog/the-different-types-of-diesel-fuel/

And: https://www.cashcarsbuyer.com/what-is-diesel-2/

FWIW, old school, you'd mix some Kerosene (similar to, but not quite the same as, Diesel #1) with your Diesel if you were up north, say, mid 20's (F) or lower. The ratio depended on how cold it was going to get. Then, they came out with winter blend diesel...does the same, but a little better. AND there's the additives we've discussed.

(I mentioned Power Service Diesel Kleen: I've used that on a Diesel VW for ~6 years. I used it on a Diesel Mercedes for a loooooong time before that. For my EcoDiesel Laramie, I run a 50/50 blend of Amsoil Diesel Injector Clean and Amsoil Diesel Cetane Boost. (I run them at 1 oz, each, per 5 gallons. So, I add 2oz. of my 50/50 mix per 5 gallons of fuel. The cool thing about that? 2 oz. ~ 56 ml. If I'm adding 56ml per 5 gallons, I just use 10ml per gallon. Because science...) )

The lubricity of the additives is a key ingredient missing from US ULSD fuels. I really, really, really recommend finding an additive you like and using it religiously.

Read this about ULSD and lubricity: https://axi-international.com/ultra-low-sulfur-diesel-ulsd/

Oh, did I mention to use additives? ;)
 

Sascwatch

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If the price of diesel jumped up a few cents right before winter it’s a good bet the stations swapped to winter blend diesel.

I’ve experienced temps down to -30C without using any additives without any issues. Our trucks are also equipped with a heater located in the fuel filter housing to prevent the filter from clogging should there be any gelling in the fuel.

Any areas that frequently drop below the freezing mark should automatically switch to winter blend in late November/December. In southern Ontario where I live you can usually tell when the change is made as diesel prices go up several cents per litre, in spring the prices usually drop back down.

I would recommend any additives by hot shot secrets if you do plan on using any, I add their EDT at every fillup.
 

LouNY

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A lot of misconception being bandied about here.
Very little fuel in NY is blended winter fuel,
most of it has additives added at the depot when picked up for deliveries for the forecast temperatures.

Yes, without a doubt treat your own fuel I have used the white bottle Power Service for many years
with good results.

When they start forecasting for -teens I will add K-1 directly to my tank, along with the Power Serve.
25% K-1 with treated #2 will work good down to -20F if anticipating colder then that I'll add more K-1.
 

djevox

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If the price of diesel jumped up a few cents right before winter it’s a good bet the stations swapped to winter blend diesel.

I’ve experienced temps down to -30C without using any additives without any issues. Our trucks are also equipped with a heater located in the fuel filter housing to prevent the filter from clogging should there be any gelling in the fuel.

Any areas that frequently drop below the freezing mark should automatically switch to winter blend in late November/December. In southern Ontario where I live you can usually tell when the change is made as diesel prices go up several cents per litre, in spring the prices usually drop back down.

I would recommend any additives by hot shot secrets if you do plan on using any, I add their EDT at every fillup.
I use EDT also- it’s great stuff.
 

J-Cooz

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-29°C the other day. No additives, no problem. If you're in NY I wouldn't worry one bit about it.

Sent from my SM-G781W using Tapatalk
 

Aseras

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The Pump and filter have preheaters. If the truck won't start becuase of gelling, put it in run ( press start twice, but dont step on brake ) It will run the heater and "thaw" out the fuel after a few minutes. Then you should be able to start the truck. You should also get the wait to start message to run the glow plugs, but you need to wait longer if it won't start and the fuel is gelled.

It's in the Ram Diesel Supplement, to the owners manual.

Extreme Cold Weather The engine block heater is a resistance heater installed in the water jacket of the engine. It requires a 110–115 Volt AC electrical outlet with a grounded, three-wire extension cord. Its use is recommended for environments that routinely fall below -10°F (-23°C). It should be used when the vehicle has not been running overnight or longer periods and should be plugged in two hours prior to start. Its use is required for cold starts with temperatures under -20°F (-28°C). NOTE: The engine block heater cord is a factory installed option. If your vehicle is not equipped, heater cords are available from your authorized Mopar dealer. • A 12 Volt heater built into the fuel filter housing aids in preventing fuel gelling. It is controlled by a built-in thermostat. • A Diesel Pre-Heat system both improves engine starting and reduces the amount of white smoke generated by a warming engine.

The engine block heater warms engine coolant and permits quicker starts in cold weather. Connect the heater cord to a ground-fault interrupter protected 110–115 Volt AC electrical outlet with a grounded, three-wire extension cord. Its use is recommended for environments that routinely fall below -10°F (-23°C). It should be used when the vehicle has not been running for long periods of time and should be plugged in two hours prior to start. Its use is required for cold starts with temperatures under -20°F (-28°C).
 

NorthStar

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The Pump and filter have preheaters. If the truck won't start becuase of gelling, put it in run ( press start twice, but dont step on brake ) It will run the heater and "thaw" out the fuel after a few minutes. Then you should be able to start the truck. You should also get the wait to start message to run the glow plugs, but you need to wait longer if it won't start and the fuel is gelled.

It's in the Ram Diesel Supplement, to the owners manual.

Extreme Cold Weather The engine block heater is a resistance heater installed in the water jacket of the engine. It requires a 110–115 Volt AC electrical outlet with a grounded, three-wire extension cord. Its use is recommended for environments that routinely fall below -10°F (-23°C). It should be used when the vehicle has not been running overnight or longer periods and should be plugged in two hours prior to start. Its use is required for cold starts with temperatures under -20°F (-28°C). NOTE: The engine block heater cord is a factory installed option. If your vehicle is not equipped, heater cords are available from your authorized Mopar dealer. • A 12 Volt heater built into the fuel filter housing aids in preventing fuel gelling. It is controlled by a built-in thermostat. • A Diesel Pre-Heat system both improves engine starting and reduces the amount of white smoke generated by a warming engine.

The engine block heater warms engine coolant and permits quicker starts in cold weather. Connect the heater cord to a ground-fault interrupter protected 110–115 Volt AC electrical outlet with a grounded, three-wire extension cord. Its use is recommended for environments that routinely fall below -10°F (-23°C). It should be used when the vehicle has not been running for long periods of time and should be plugged in two hours prior to start. Its use is required for cold starts with temperatures under -20°F (-28°C).
You've posted excellent points however (and I may be wrong) but the tank isn't heated and if you've got #2 in your tank at -20F or -30F, the diesel will be thick if not gelled. I grew up in Alaska for the first 51 years of my life (yes, I moved to Texas to thaw out during the last 1/3 of my life) and have always run a winter additive in my Cummins, Duramax and PowerJokes to prevent gelling. The block heater and preheaters certainly help with starting/running but if you've got a tank full of gel, none of those will help you. Stanadyne or another quality additive is your best insurance when it gets extremely cold.
 

djevox

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You've posted excellent points however (and I may be wrong) but the tank isn't heated and if you've got #2 in your tank at -20F or -30F, the diesel will be thick if not gelled. I grew up in Alaska for the first 51 years of my life (yes, I moved to Texas to thaw out during the last 1/3 of my life) and have always run a winter additive in my Cummins, Duramax and PowerJokes to prevent gelling. The block heater and preheaters certainly help with starting/running but if you've got a tank full of gel, none of those will help you. Stanadyne or another quality additive is your best insurance when it gets extremely cold.
With ULSD, wax dropout is a bigger concern than gelling, in the biggest issue is icing (which people mistake as gelling).
 

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