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Coating on Studs to Mount Side Steps

Sloneranger

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Hi,
Does anyone have a good way to remove the factory coating from these stud threads? I have a die that I am afraid will damage the threads and a powerful solvent that may damage me.
I need to remove the coating on the truck frame studs used to attach side steps. I bought black ICI Magnum RT side steps (part # RTS37DG) to mount myself. The ICI instructions say to use a die to remove any coating. I am afraid the die will remove more than just the coating and the threads will be damaged. I have the correct size die but I would have to begin forcing it onto a stud. So, I bought some Rustoleum "Aircraft Remover" to brush on the threads and let sit for 10-15 minutes. Then I plan on using toothbrush sized brass brushes to remove the coating which should be loosened up by the solvent. The solvent is very powerful and I need chemical proof gloves, chemical resistant goggles and to hold my breath.
Has anyone found a better method?
Thanks for reading this far,
Richard
2019 Laramie
 

Agitated

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Do not use a solvent and do not use a die. Either use a wire wheel on a drill or dremel, or a thread chaser. A die removes material. A thread chaser cleans it up.
 

geotex1

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The factory coating is not that tough. You don't need the paint stripper you bought. A fine brass brush wheel on a Dremel, die grinder or drill will clean them up. You can also use brake fluid, yes fluid not cleaner, and a sponge brush to apply it to them. Dot 3 and 4 brake fluid is stellar at eating through coatings, and you won't pass out or ignite yourself with vapors. As Agitated said, no dice on a die! If you have an old school hardware store in your neighborhood, you might be able to get a proper chase. If not, wire wheel, a little brake fluid and use a new nut to chase the valleys slowly a little at a time backing off regularly and removing the coating that's accumulated. You can then clean the thread free of brake fluid with rubbing alchohol. This is probably more than the average Joe would do, but given who I am I know proper torque is only achieved on clean, dry threads.
 

Sooliman

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I used a wire wheel on a drill, took about 15 minutes a side (9 studs each side) and as most said, the coating isn’t thick. 10 of the 15 minutes was repositioning the blanket I was laying on and taking my time not to wire wheel anything I didn’t want to wire wheel. I did re-coat with a little black rustoleum to prevent future rusting of the bare bolts. All in all, easy job.
 

Bram2019

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I know a few guys that used a butane pencil torch to soften up the paint and it peeled right off.
 

KRField

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I found on mine all top studs were fine. The bottom studs I bumped a few times with a wire wheel then threaded a Grade 8 nut on with Penetrating lube to clear the threads.

The most time consuming was adjusting the steps. My OCD way going haywire.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Zebber

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I used a die to remove the paint on mine, can't remember what size it was though, maybe 8x.125mm? Took just a few minutes on each side,, the top studs didn't need anything done to them. I painted them with clear after I installed the brackets to prevent rust.
 

Kork

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I saw the instructions to use a die but having never used one, didn’t want to screw something up. I got a can of spray on paint remover from Lowe’s (sprays with a thin tube for the nozzle, like wd40. Let it sit 10 minutes then sprayed again and went to town with a wire wheel brush on the drill. Was pretty frustrated at first but eventually got it. I also had a 8-1.125 ( don’t quote me on that size) nut to use to check if the threads were clean enough for the real ones. It definitely took more than 10 minutes per side to do the six bottoms, maybe 5 minutes per bolt, but eventually got it!
 

HotStuff

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I used a butane torch and just heated up the studs a little too burn the paint off them. Then took a small wire brush to them and the remnants just brushed right off. The nuts threaded right on with no problems.
 

tistan

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I just ran the nuts down on mine. Had the steps installed in less than an hour.
 

Dmalonecentral

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A little bit of paint stripper and a wire brush on my drill. Didn’t take long at all.


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Btdpi007

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I went the die route and first time for me and it worked perfectly. The correct die is 8 x 1.25.
 

Bleda2002

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I just used the nut and an inpact driver, nut cleaned off the paint, threads stayed fine.

Only downside was having paint chips in my face on the first one since I was laying directly under it.
 

RodRow

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A few minutes with a wire wheel on drill, on the lower studs, and 2 drops of 3-in-1 oil made the job super quick and easy. Cost me $4 for the wheel as I’d “misplaced” mine.
 

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