2020 EcoDiesel Test, including Towing

go-ram

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Lots of practical, real-world info in that video, thanks for sharing it.
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kmayer

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Thanks for posting. Reinforced by current plan of getting 5.7. Well done video.
 

Reverse

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Thanks for posting. Reinforced by current plan of getting 5.7. Well done video.
His car reviews are the best - He's done quite a few on vehicles I (used to) own, and they're always fair and to the point. He also did a great one on the ETorque system BTW.
 

tyresmoker

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Lost a ton of credibility with me when he chose to use the diesel "engine brake". CI engines do not generate back pressure in their cylinders on their own.
Just ask Mr. Jacobs.
 

go-ram

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Lost a ton of credibility with me when he chose to use the diesel "engine brake". CI engines do not generate back pressure in their cylinders on their own.
Just ask Mr. Jacobs.
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True, up to a point. Although "exhaust brake" is technically more correct for these light-duty diesels of course, in the big picture, one could argue that braking the vehicle by restricting the exhaust is simply a different mechanism than using the throttle plate in a spark-ignition engine to restrict intake air, or via compression-release braking (Jacobs). It is all one form or another of "engine braking" in the larger sense.
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The bottom line is, the Ram Ecodiesel's lack of any active form of utilizing the engine to slow the vehicle was the author's point, and the only important point.
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tyresmoker

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True, up to a point. Although "exhaust brake" is technically more correct for these light-duty diesels of course, in the big picture, one could argue that braking the vehicle by restricting the exhaust is simply a different mechanism than using the throttle plate in a spark-ignition engine to restrict intake air, or via compression-release braking (Jacobs). It is all one form or another of "engine braking" in the larger sense.
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The bottom line is, the Ram Ecodiesel's lack of any active form of utilizing the engine to slow the vehicle was the author's point, and the only important point.
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The ED also does not have wings, but surely it might fly if it did.....In other words, the know-it-all was looking for something that is not there, nor is it promoted to be.
 

the wanderer

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The ED also does not have wings, but surely it might fly if it did.....In other words, the know-it-all was looking for something that is not there, nor is it promoted to be.
Completely unfair. He was comparing the ED to the GM diesel which does use engine braking.

Whatever beef you seem to have with Alex, that's your problem. Alex is as far away from "know-it-all" as you can possibly get. I've rarely seen a more accurate (or attempt at accuracy), unbiased, well researched, and well presented reviewer.
 

tyresmoker

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Completely unfair. He was comparing the ED to the GM diesel which does use engine braking.

Whatever beef you seem to have with Alex, that's your problem. Alex is as far away from "know-it-all" as you can possibly get. I've rarely seen a more accurate (or attempt at accuracy), unbiased, well researched, and well presented reviewer.
My point is quite simple. The ED is not equipped with an engine/exhaust brake. Period. Selecting a lower gear on a downhill grade is pointless if a CI engine is not equipped with such. Why he chose to even go there demonstrates (to me) he really does not understand the inner workings of a CI engine...
 

go-ram

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My point is quite simple. The ED is not equipped with an engine/exhaust brake. Period. Selecting a lower gear on a downhill grade is pointless if a CI engine is not equipped with such. Why he chose to even go there demonstrates (to me) he really does not understand the inner workings of a CI engine...
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I might be missing something here, but the video reviewer's whole point was simply that the Ecodiesel has no form of engine braking whatsoever, whereas (a) the new GM twins' inline six 3-liter diesel does have engine braking (exhaust side), and the Ram 1500 with 5.7 L gasoline engine also has engine braking (intake side). He was simply pointing out to potential buyers that, if they like to have any kind of engine braking because they tow in hilly country, they might want to consider either the 5.7 L Hemi gas engine in the Ram, or go with either of the GM twins with 3-liter diesel with exhaust braking.
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Again, it was NOT wrong of him to say "the ecodiesel has no engine braking", because the term "engine braking" actually is the most general term that encompasses all three of the most common types: gas-engine "engine braking" via closing off the intake side of the engine, "exhaust braking" with diesels by closing off the exhaust side, and "compression-release braking" (Jacobs). Each of those three examples ultimately relies on the pumping action of the engine to accomplish the resistance that slows the vehicle via the drive-train gearing, hence all three are, technically, examples of "engine braking".
 

HST

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Tfl did a towing test down hill against the new GM diesel with the engine brake and the ram used less brakes than the GM . Transmission shifting software did a better job
helping to hold it back.
 

tyresmoker

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I might be missing something here, but the video reviewer's whole point was simply that the Ecodiesel has no form of engine braking whatsoever, whereas (a) the new GM twins' inline six 3-liter diesel does have engine braking (exhaust side), and the Ram 1500 with 5.7 L gasoline engine also has engine braking (intake side). He was simply pointing out to potential buyers that, if they like to have any kind of engine braking because they tow in hilly country, they might want to consider either the 5.7 L Hemi gas engine in the Ram, or go with either of the GM twins with 3-liter diesel with exhaust braking.
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Again, it was NOT wrong of him to say "the ecodiesel has no engine braking", because the term "engine braking" actually is the most general term that encompasses all three of the most common types: gas-engine "engine braking" via closing off the intake side of the engine, "exhaust braking" with diesels by closing off the exhaust side, and "compression-release braking" (Jacobs). Each of those three examples ultimately relies on the pumping action of the engine to accomplish the resistance that slows the vehicle via the drive-train gearing, hence all three are, technically, examples of "engine braking".
Never mind...
 

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